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FAQs

What is the starting age for dance class?

We offer classes for 3 years old – adult.

When do classes start?

Classes begin in mid September.

How long are classes?

Each class is one hour long per week from September thru June.

Why Should I send my Child to Dance School?

Many people did not have the opportunity to attend dance school as children. You are not alone if you did not have this opportunity as a child. But you may want this opportunity for your child without understanding why.

1. Dance is an education just as any other form of learning. It should be understood that learning to dance is part of a person’s education and not just something to do with kids on Saturdays or after school. People often have said to me, “I don’t expect my child to be a professional dancer…” No, but that is no reason to keep a child from studying dance. After all, a child studies math with no intention of becoming an accountant. We all must learn how to add. And we all need to learn geography without ever becoming world explorers.

2. Dance training has many benefits to students:

  •  They learn to be more aware of themselves
  •  They learn to control their body
  •  They learn to discipline both mind and body
  •  They can withstand pain more easily
  •  They have better peripheral vision
  •  They have better posture
  •  They move more gracefully
  •  They learn to play sports better
  •  They learn the importance of team work

Dance students are sometimes the most busy, active students on school campuses (elementary,
junior, high school and college). They learn to budget their time because they know that their school lessons are important, but so are their dance lessons. Because of this and the physical activity involved, dancers tend to have more stamina. And after all, it is people with stamina
who win life’s races, battles and challenges. Students gain an appreciation for all the arts because dance class makes the student aware
of music and art.

What to Expect of Different Age Groups?

Ages 3-5: Children of this age group have all they can do to learn coordination, because they are not coordinated at this age. They are anatomically difficult to coordinate; their body and head are larger proportionately to their arms and legs. Their body is in a reverse triangle to an adult structure; they are small at the top and large at the bottom. Their bones are not all present or solidly formed, they have little or no experience in balancing or coordination or putting facts together. Their center of gravity is near the chest and not near the pelvis as an adult. They have little ability to associate except on a level of ‘good’–‘bad’–‘fun’–‘not fun’, etc. They say very definite things and they are emotionally not ready to cope. They exercise little control – too hot, too cold, thirsty, tired, hungry, sleepy, etc. Their concentration span is 5-20 minutes and they must have play time. They do try to please if responded to and they’ll do almost anything for attention such as crying, throwing tantrums, etc. They have excellent imaginations and are able to create well if guided properly. Noise is necessary and what appears to be play is involving principles and an easier method than strictness. The total aim of the first year is to offer the students the beginning of learning, counting, rhythm (keeping in time with the music), listening to the music and noticing the changes in it, coordination (arms and head with feet), cooperation with others (their classmates, their teachers and their parents), sharing and one’s own place. Progress may be slow but be patient they must walk before they fly.

Ages 6-9: They now have coordination and must work for all types of rhythm. Now they must listen to music. It is not just important to learn “more” steps, they must really start to perfect former technique and learn musical timing and phrasing.

Ages 10 and over: Now we start to fly with the students and absolute rhythm is a must. Good timing is essential and we now demand more speed when necessary for up-tempo music and the grace and fluidly control movements when a more lyrical type of music is used.

These stages are prevalent in tap and jazz. Excellent technique and a firm foundation are the keys to a well trained dance student.

The Key to Our Students Success

Because we, as teachers and you, as parents are the two groups who have the greatest impact on our young dancers and clearly, if we are at odds, it will be the dancers who will suffer. Our goal is a position of cooperation. Parents must understand and endorse our philosophical approach and direction in the role that dance training should play in our young dancers’ lives:

• We Emphasize Fun and Technical Development In All Classes. (Some parents might have goals of quick stardom for their child; a fundamental philosophical difference which can have a significant impact on the attitudes and behaviors of the teachers and on the goals set by the student).

• We Attempt To Build A Sound Technical Foundation In All Students. (Some parents wish to use dance lessons as a time filler between sports seasons and other activities; another philosophical difference which can have significant impact on the goals set by the student).

We Are Not Here To Teach Students A Dance; We Are Here To Teach Them How To Dance. We are foundation builders! Analogy: If the foundation is built strong, the building will stand high and will last and last. If the foundation is weak, the building will crumble and fall sooner than later. “Moderation Is Virtue” but we temper our approach to motivate the release of inhibition with a firm sense of discipline.

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